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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 43-47

Soft-fixed embalming: Our experiences


1 Associate Professor, Department of Anatomy, Dr. Ram Manohar Lohia Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India
2 Assistant Professor, Department of Anatomy, Dr. Ram Manohar Lohia Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India
3 Professor and Head, Department of Anatomy, Dr. Ram Manohar Lohia Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India
4 Professor Emeritus, Department of Anatomy, Eras Lucknow Medical College and Hospital, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India
5 Assistant Professor, Department of Anatomy, Eras Lucknow Medical College and Hospital, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh, India

Correspondence Address:
Eti Sthapak
Department of Anatomy, Dr. Ram Manohar Lohia Institute of Medical Sciences, Lucknow, Uttar Pradesh
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/NJCA.NJCA_2_20

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Background: There is an increased need for surgical skills training which does not involve patients in the first exposure. Clinicians and surgeons prefer honing their psychomotor skills on cadavers. Standard formalin embalming, however, does not provide a very realistic model, so an alternative approach needs to be sorted out in the form of soft-fixed embalmed cadavers to provide realistic model for such procedures. Aim: This study aimed to evolve new methods of soft embalming, which provide better cadavers for surgical training. Objectives: (1) To provide long-term structural preservation of tissues, viscera, and body and prevent fungal and bacterial growth. (2) To explore the use of glutaraldehyde solution for arterial embalming. (3) To obtain cadavers with soft consistency of muscle and tendon and maintain joint mobility. (4) To provide lifelike quality of soft-fixed cadavers for cadaveric surgical workshops. Materials and Methods: Only those bodies which were received within 12 h of death were used for soft embalming. The solution for soft embalming contained glutaraldehyde, glycerin, methanol, cetrimide, and eosin for arterial and formalin solution for cavity embalming. The cadavers were embalmed and then preserved in a deep freezer (−70°C to −80°C) for at least 30 days. After that, the cadavers were preserved in an immersion tank which contained 10% formalin diluted in water. Results: Soft-fixed embalmed cadavers were better for all aspects of training. Soft-fixed cadavers exhibited a greater degree of flexibility and color retention compared to that of traditional formalin-fixed cadavers. The preference was particularly pronounced in aspects that require flexibility of tissues such as for flap raising. Conclusions: Soft-embalmed cadavers provide a more realistic model for training of surgical skills.


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